TBN Ranch Bantams border

Welcome to the TBN Ranch blog, an informative resource site for fellow backyard chicken keepers.
We are a hobby farm dedicated to raising a variety of standard and bantam chickens in Phoenix, Arizona. 

Articles 2The primary reason for keeping chickens varies from household to household. But for most, keeping a few backyard hens for a daily supply of fresh eggs is preferred over raising meat birds.

Maybe you’re looking for bug and weed control, or having your very own fertilizer machine for your garden. Whatever your reason, we are here to help you prepare, problem solve, and most importantly, to expect the unexpected with ease.

Resources 2Before you join the trendy circle of urban chicken keepers, you’ll want to familiarize yourself with what this responsibility actually entails.

There are a few basics to learn before you get started, research is always your best tool for success…. and there’s an array of information right here to help you in your successful pursuit.

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Chicks, Chicks, and More Chicks!

This little lady is a standard Silver Laced Cochin, she’s 3.5 weeks old and growing fast. I don’t usually raise standards, my preference is definitely bantams, but  sometimes we have to veer a little from the norm, right?

Right now there are Silkies in the brooder, cochins, and next month I’ll have eight Mille Fleur d’Uccle Bantams arriving. This will surely keep me busy through the winter. Come spring I’ll pick the birds I want to keep, and the rest will be sold. 

Silver Laced Cochin 100115

Cochin chickenIt is doubtful that any other single breed of chicken has inspired more people to keep poultry as a hobby or fancy. When the Cochin chicken made its debut outside of China it was met with astonishment, wonder, and awe. Continue Reading

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8 Questions To Ask Yourself Before You Get Backyard Chickens

Unfortunately, sometimes people aren’t suitable to raise chickens. Make sure you ask yourself these 8 questions to see if you are suitable to raise backyard chickens… Continue Reading article by The Happy Chicken Coop

8-Questions-To-Ask-Yourself-Before-You-Get-Backyard-Chickens-Blog-Coverhatcheries Index2

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Out for Breakfast

These are my best Silkie Moms, which means they are rarely seen all together. One, or all these ladies are usually broody in their house, either sitting on eggs or pretending to be. It’s molt season, perhaps they’re on break so they can drop a gazillion feathers all over the place. Whatever their reason for stepping out to breakfast this morning, it was nice to see them scratching around in the dirt and just be chickens for a change.

The Breakfast Club

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New Chicken Keeping Articles | Sept. 28, 2015

TBN Ranch GravitarThis week’s Articles for Chicken Keepers, by Chicken Keepers.
An updated collection of chicken keeping articles from across the web archived in one convenient library on our menu bar.

Have an article to submit? Send it to amyichi@yahoo.com with ARTICLE SUBMISSION on the subject line.

All About Molting

New Articles | September 28, 2015
Marans Chickens | Layers of Chocolate Brown Eggs
Chicken Quarters: 3 Reasons For Decline In Egg Quality – Urban Farm
The Chicken Chick®: Chicken Coop Bedding: Sand, the Litter Superstar
Broodiness in Chickens – Hobby Farms
6 Coop-winterizing Chores – Hobby Farms
Speckled Sussex : the right breed for you?
Treating and Preventing Frostbite in Chickens Naturally | Fresh Eggs Daily®
About Organic Chicken Farms – Hobby Farms
Wyandotte Chickens: A Top Backyard Choice | Backyard Poultry Magazine

Feature Article…


Special Announcement!

Mop Dolls Plus Header with Text

Andi 92615When I’m not playing chicken lady, I love to spend time in my craft studio. Not sure when, or even why I started making dolls from ordinary household mops… it just sort of happened!

I recently opened an Etsy store for my homemade dolls. I hope you’ll visit!  Mop Dolls Plus -amy elizabeth

FYI: I added Mop Dolls Plus to my menu bar so you can always stop by and see what’s new.

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Disinfecting Your Coop, Here’s How

Given your Coop a Thorough Cleaning Lately?


Disinfecting your coop is a crucial step which the small flock owner might normally overlook. Disinfectants should be applied only after the building and equipment have been thoroughly cleaned, ideally right after rinsing. Disinfectants can be applied by sprays, aerosols or fumigation.

Don’t be intimidated by the thought of “fumigating” your hen house: for most small flock facilities, using a garden type sprayer is the easiest method, and chances are you already have a suitable disinfectant around the house. The types of disinfectants generally used are phenolic compounds (e.g., Pine-sol, One Stroke, Osyl),  iodine or iodophors, (e.g., Betadine and Weladol), chlorine compounds (e.g., Clorox, generic bleach), quaternary ammonium compound (e.g., Roccal D Plus) and oxidizing compounds (e.g., Virkon S, Oxy-Sept 333).

Follow the manufacturer’s directions for mixing and dilution of these disinfectants.  A good rule of thumb is to apply at the rate of one gallon of diluted disinfectant per 150-200 square feet of surface area. For a more thorough disinfecting, soak waterers and feeders in a 200 ppm chlorine solution (1 tablespoon chlorine bleach per gallon of boiling water).

Source:  Cornell University | Small Farms Program


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Chickens in the House is Nothing to Brag About

amy elizabethChickens in the house? Really? This is not a practice I would boast about to the world, but yet I see pictures every single day online. Chickens wandering around kitchens, sitting on the back of couches, and looking in the back doors and windows of homes. The list goes on and on.

Chickens are not house pets, and though SO MANY people allow their mature chickens in the house, I consider this practice a potential health risk, and irresponsible to say the least.

The rule of thumb is to keep a clean area between chickens and your living space.  That means chickens don’t belong in the yard, on the patio, where children play, or anywhere that family traffic is common. Chickens should have their own area outside. They are NOT companion animals like dogs and cats, and shouldn’t be allowed the same indoor perks.

Why is This so Important?

It’s common for chickens to carry Salmonella, which is a type of germ that naturally lives in the intestines and is shed in their feces. Live poultry may have Salmonella germs on their bodies (including feathers, feet, and beaks) even when they appear healthy and clean. The germs can also get on coops, hay, plants, and soil in the area where the birds live and roam. Additionally, the germs can be found on the hands, shoes, and clothing of those who handle the birds or work or play where they live and roam.

Each spring, children become infected with Salmonella, but it’s important to remember that illness can occur from chicks or adult birds at any time of the year. Children are exposed to Salmonella by holding, cuddling, or kissing the birds and by touching things where the bird lives, such as cages or feed and water bowls. Young children are especially at risk for illness because their immune systems are still developing and because they are more likely than others to put their fingers or other items into their mouths.

How Common is Salmonella?

CDC estimates that approximately 1.2 million illnesses and approximately 450 deaths occur from Salmonella annually in the United States alone.

And Furthermore…  Shame on Manufacturers

It doesn’t help that chicken diapers and clothes are being marketed. These items are made simply because people will buy them. Nothing of the sort makes it safe to allow chickens indoors… nothing.


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