Chicks Will Be Available in Phoenix Soon

Which Chicks and Where to Find Them
Which Breeds Beat the Heat

In about two weeks Phoenix area feed stores will be stocking up their brooders with an abundance of baby chicks for you to buy. You’ll see the most popular breeds, usually the best layers of brown, tinted, and blue-green eggs. The fancy breeds, commonly called ornamental, or exhibition chicks are rarely found locally, but they are easily located online at hatcheries who will safely ship chicks to you.

Choosing the Right Chicks

Rhode Island Red, TBN Ranch

If your sole purpose for keeping chickens is for lots of eggs, you’ll want to choose a proven breed known to yield over 200 eggs per year.

Rhode Island Reds and Leghorns rate high on my list of excellent producers. However, I don’t particularly care for the chicken yard drama that come with the brown egg laying Rhode Island Red. They can be bossy and a bit aggressive when demanding their place in the pecking order. However, they are a favorite among many chicken keepers and very heat hardy.

The Leghorn will give you white eggs of good size, most every day, but I don’t consider them very heat hardy in Phoenix’s extreme temperatures. Still, with a little effort to accommodate their extra needs in summer, I like them. The Leghorn is not readily available, but if you look around, you’ll find them. Pratts in Glendale or The Feed Barn in Phoenix are usually a goods place to find a wide variety of chicks or pullets.

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The Ameraucana or Easter Egger will be available most likely in every feed store. They are quite popular for their blue-green eggs. I consider them very heat hardy, and they get along nicely with other members of the flock.

The Ameraucana is a docile bird, predictable, and an excellent layer. Best described as aloof, not what I consider a social bird. If your looking for more of a social bird, lets talk Orpingtons!

 

Chickens Jan 2010 roosters 001

Orpingtons are a brown egg layer, very docile, social, and a nice choice to include in your flock.

They’re not especially heat hardy, but if provided with ample shade, an area to dig to cooler ground, and adequate space they will fair well.

This heavy breed has broody tendencies and this may be a problem if they retire to a hot coop and refuse to leave during the summer months. I have experienced heat exhaustion a few times with this breed, so this is definitely something to consider if you’re not willing to give them extra special attention.

My Favorite Places to Buy Common Chicks in the Phoenix Area:

🙂 Pratts / Large selection of chicks, sometimes pullets, hens, & roosters
Western Ranchman / Common chicks
Pet Club Feed & Tack, N. Phoenix / Common chick varieties
Pet Food Depot / Common chick varieties

feed barn–> For a Wide Variety of Rare or Hard to Find Chicks & Pullets…

🙂 The Feed Barn
22226 N 23rd Ave. Suite #3. Just north of Deer Valley Rd.

 

Looking to Order Chicks from a Hatchery?

🙂 Murray McMurray / The World’s Rare Breed Poultry Headquarters
🙂 My Pet Chicken Chicks, pullets, coops, & supplies
Meyer Hatchery / Offering 160 varieties of Chickens, Ducks, Turkeys, Exotic Fowl & More
Stromberg’s / Provides over 200 varieties of chickens
Cackle Hatchery / Hatchery & Supplies
🙂 Ideal / Breeding Farms / Hatchery breeds chickens bantams ducks chicks

 

🙂 For more information on raising chickens visit my Chicken Keeping Resource Library and FAQ’s page.

 

 

 

 

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About tbnranch

amy elizabeth, writer, author. Lives in the northeastern reaches of the Sonoran Desert on a small hobby farm. Raises laying hens.
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2 Responses to Chicks Will Be Available in Phoenix Soon

  1. Buffy says:

    Strange for them to be available in the fall. Here in Arkansas the only time the feed stores have them is in the Spring.

    • tbnranch says:

      That’s because it’s too hot here from April to Oct. Our winter temperatures aren’t usually lower than 65-70. Nights can get colder, but rarely freezing. It’s just a lot easier to keep chicks warn than trying to keep them cool in 110 degrees.

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