Dosages of the Good Stuff… for Chickens with Parasites

When you Need Real Help, Here’s the Article! (Bottom of Page)
Warning: Don’t read if you’re into all that natural stuff. 

Natural remedies just don’t cut it in many cases, tried them all and found them to be only minimally successful. If you have a real problem sometimes you just have to get out the big guns so to speak and use what works… drugs, chemicals, and whatever, as far as I’m concerned. I want fast, effective, and what’s readily available at most feed stores and/or online. Problem is how to use these products, because as you may already know, there’s not much information on dosages for chickens. It’s pretty much a guessing game. Also, good luck finding a veterinarian who knows.. or even has a slight clue about treating chickens. So, we do what we can to help our flocks, then we share information that may be helpful to other chicken keepers. Here’s my story to share…

MAJOR Feather Loss and the Use of Ivermectin

I spent two days looking for help on the dosage for Ivermectin to treat my flock for some sort of mite, internal parasite, or whatever, didn’t know. Topical applications weren’t working and natural treatments were a giant waste of time. In my opinion, this meant Ivermectin would be the best choice for treatment. Not surprised to find there was nothing on the label for treating chickens, only livestock.  Finally, I just took the word of a chicken keeper who was quite convincing that 4cc’s of injectable (not pour on) Ivermectin to a gallon of drinking water for 2 days would do the trick. Then, repeat treatment in 14 days. I followed her instructions to clean the coop thoroughly and then confine the birds with the treated water. I sprayed the coop first with Pyrethrin according to the label dilution for treating mites. Nasty stuff, but sorry folks, sometimes that’s what it takes.

Well, it worked. Nobody died, and I saw improvement over the next 3 days. Injectable Ivermectin (not pour on) is sold at Tractor Supply. Costs about $30. but it will keep a long time.
I’m not a vet, just saying it worked for me when I was desperate to find a solution to my flocks problem.  How long to withdraw from eating eggs? Don’t really know, but I will be throwing away eggs until treatment is over, and then wait another 30-45 days at least before consuming eggs. 

Must Read Article
After the fact, I found this super helpful article. Looks like the real deal on parasite control, I recommend saving this article to your bookmarks! Real medications and dosages for chickens and parasites, AWESOME!

If you have a nice or helpful comment to add, please do. Otherwise, skip it.

PARASITE CONTROL IN POULTRY

By Dr   BSc, BVSc, MRCVS, MACVSc (Avian health) 

MelbBirdVet

Parasites of concern in poultry are roundworm, hairworm and tapeworm, Coccidia and lice and mites. Worms are extremely common, particularly in free-range poultry. Being a primary parasite, they drain the birds of nutrition, causing ill-thrift, a general failure to thrive, a vulnerability to other diseases, and, in severe infections, death. Both roundworm and hairworm have what is called a direct life cycle in that the eggs are passed in the droppings and after a period of time in the environment, become infective. New birds become infected by inadvertently eating these eggs while feeding, drinking or scratching around their yard. Once an egg is swallowed, it hatches and eventually matures into a new worm in the bird’s bowel. READ ARTICLE

 

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About tbnranch

amy elizabeth, writer, author, antique dealer. Lives in the northeastern reaches of the Sonoran Desert on a small hobby farm.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Content Contributors, Managing the Flock and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Dosages of the Good Stuff… for Chickens with Parasites

  1. Pingback: Resource Library for Chicken Keepers | TBN Ranch Chicken Keeping

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