Chickens, History and Ancestry

History of the Chicken
by Phillip Clauer, PennState Extension

History of the Chicken

Domestication of the chicken dates back to at least 2000 B.C. and their ancestry can be traced back to four species of wild jungle fowl from Southeast Asia.
However, the Red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus or Gallus bankiva) is the most commonly found wild species in the world today and is considered the main ancestor of the domestic chicken. The chicken belongs to the genus Gallus of the family Phasianidae. Domestic chickens are simply classified as Gallus domesticus… Continue Reading

The Domestication History of Chickens 
by K. Kris Hirst

Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) in Kaziranga National park in Assam, India

The history of chickens (Gallus domesticus) is still a bit of a puzzle. Scholars agree that they were first domesticated from a wild form called red junglefowl (Gallus gallus), a bird that still runs wild in most of southeast Asia, most likely hybridized with the gray junglefowl (G. sonneratii). That occurred probably about 8,000 years ago. Recent research suggests, however, there may have been multiple other domestication events in distinct areas of South and Southeast Asia, southern China, Thailand, Burma, and India… Continue Reading

 

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Do you Have a Donkey or a Burro?

What’s the Difference?

This is a common question. Regarding burros and donkeys in specific, there’s a very simple answer…

Beamer

The Spanish word “burro” came from the word “Burrisimo” meaning little horse.  The word Donkey came from the English word “dun” and “ky” which means small.  Basically, both words have the same meaning… or do they?

Here in the U.S. we use both terms, for these specific reasons…

• A Donkey is domesticated

• A Burro is wild, or free roaming

That’s it! Now, if you really want to be confused, visit Donkey, Ass, Burro, Mule, What They All Mean.