Salmonella Outbreaks Linked to Backyard Poultry | CDC

In This Article:

  • What you Need to Know if you’re Consuming Fresh Farm Eggs.
  • Salmonella Illness Fast Facts, August 2022
  • What You Need to Know as a Backyard Chicken Keeper

Whether you are raising backyard chickens or consuming fresh eggs from a local chicken keeper, there are a few precautions to be aware of. Salmonella is real, and a serious health threat that exists everywhere… even from local backyard chicken keepers.

Salmonella Illness Facts, August 2022

  • Illnesses: 884
  • Hospitalizations: 158
  • Deaths: 2
  • States: 48 and the District of Columbia
  • Investigation status: Active

What You Need to Know as a Consumer of Backyard Farm Fresh Eggs

  • Backyard poultry, such as chickens and ducks, can carry Salmonella germs even if they look healthy and clean. These germs can easily spread to anything in the areas where the poultry live and roam.
  • You can get sick from touching backyard poultry or anything in their environment, including eggs.
  • Your eggs should never be in a used egg carton. If you’re unsure if your supplier uses new cartons, transfer the eggs into a clean wire basket. It’s a good practice to transfer eggs to your own basket before they reach your kitchen.
  • Discard dirty or irregular eggs. Dirty eggs mean the nest box is dirty, and the eggs may have been exposed to bacteria.
  • Don’t wash eggs; eggs have what is called the *bloom that protects the egg from bacteria. Washing removes the bloom, allowing bacteria to easily enter the egg.
  • Ask to see the area where the hens that supply your eggs are kept. It should be dry and not foul-smelling. The hens should look happy and healthy.
  • Never crack open the egg on the same pan you’re cooking in.
  • Wash your hands anytime you handle eggs, especially when cooking.

Those at Highest Risk of Severe Illness from Salmonella

  • Young children, especially under 5 years old.
  • Adults 65 and over, or someone with a compromised or weakened immune system.
Fancy Egg Baskets are available on Amazon, but the one shown above is from the Dollar Store!

What You Need to Know as a Backyard Chicken Keeper

  • Eggs from a backyard chicken keeper should be collected daily. Cracked, dirty, or eggs that aren’t in the nest box should be discarded. Fresh eggs are better left unwashed as not to disturb the bloom, which protects the eggs from bacteria.
  • It is good practice to clean nest boxes weekly and have at least one nest box for every three hens.
  • Don’t re-use egg cartons; or sell eggs in used cartons. Use a wire basket when collecting eggs. Ask your customers to bring their own basket or container.
  • Transfer eggs to a clean wire basket or new carton before storing them in your refrigerator.
  • Wash hands immediately after handling eggs.
  • There should be a clean space between your living quarters and the coop. Shoes, gloves, or anything you wear to work in the coop should be left in a designated area away from your living quarters. Rakes, shovels, and all cleaning supplies that are used in the coop should STAY IN THE COOP or a designated area nearby.
  • If your birds are free-roaming, they should have an area completely separate from the family home. This includes a no chicken zone where children or pets are likely to play.
  • Don’t let children younger than 5 years touch chicks, or other backyard poultry. Young children are more likely to get sick from Salmonella.

More information | CDC | Salmonella and Backyard Poultry
Centers of Disease Control & Prevention

* What is the Bloom? The “bloom” of an egg in an invisible coating that the hen’s body will “lay” on top of the shell of the egg. The bloom is also known as the cuticle of the eggs. It protects the egg from bacteria entering the egg.

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Easy Fill Waterer for Chickens, a Review

Design Flaw, Read Updated Review

Finally a drinker that’s easy to fill, simply take off the lid and fill it with the hose. Available in two sizes, 3.5 gallon & 6.25 gallon. Easy to clean, made of molded long-life plastic. Big handle for easy transport.
This drinker isn’t designed to hang, I raise it using a cinder block for adult hens.

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When is it Safe to Open the Incubator?

Opening the incubator will let out all of the warm moist air that is contained inside the machine and doing it at the wrong time will cause hatching problems. Read Article

By Neil Armitage | Cluckin
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No Waste Baby Chick Feeder by Rent a Coop, a Review

  • Adaptable for chicks up to 12 weeks old.
  • Two small ports for chicks aged 1-4 weeks old.
  • Two large ports for chicks aged 5-12 weeks old.
  • Free shipping from My Pet Chicken

I introduced this chick feeder for the first time and I love it. Two small ports for chicks aged 1-4 weeks old. Two large ports for chicks aged 5-12 weeks old. Height of feeding ports allows chicks to reach and access feed at the bottom of the container without being able to move, spill or waste the feed. You can use it free standing or it comes with mounting hardware for use on wood, or hung on wire. I use it free standing.

My chicks made the transition from a traditional chick feeder to this feeder in minutes. No waste, the chicks can’t scratch out the feed, and they can’t poop in their feed either. I highly recommend paying the $35 dollar price tag on this feeder, it’s made extremely well and will last probably close to forever.

Where to Buy

You can purchase this feeder on Amazon, or My Pet Chicken. I bought mine at My Pet Chicken, it ships free and arrived within a week.
Note: The feeder from My Pet Chicken comes with a better lid than Amazon’s, it’s pointy so the chicks can’t perch on top of it.
Important: This feeder is not for chicks under a week old.

My Pet Chicken $35.95
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