Understanding the Molting Process

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Molting is a natural process that chickens go through annually so they can replenish and replace their feathers. Chickens need to grow new feathers to allow them to effectively regulate their body temperature especially those in colder environments.
Chickens will molt several times during their lives. The first molt is called a “juvenile” molt and occurs when they are only 6 – 8 days old… Continue Reading

McMurray Hatchery Blog

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New Chicken Keeping Articles | July 16, 2015

A collection of chicken keeping articles from across the web archived in one convenient library on our menu bar.

Have an article to submit? Send it for consideration to amyichi@yahoo.com with Article Submission on the subject line.

July 16, 2015
Ameraucanas | Backyard Poultry Magazine.
Chicken Quarters: How to Store Backyard Eggs – Hobby Farms.
5 Broody Chicken Breeds Great For Hatching Eggs – Hobby Farms.
DIY Wine Bottle Chicken Grit & Oyster Shell Dispenser Tutorial | Fresh Eggs Daily®.
Why Should Eggs Be Stored Pointy End Down? | Fresh Eggs Daily®.
9 Healthy Treats Your Chickens Will Love.

Special Article of Interest …
Chicken Feather Loss: Cause and Cure

Chicken-Feather-Loss-Cause-and-Cure-Blog-Cover

Posted by The Happy Chicken Coop

It can be a frightening sight, walking out towards your chicken coop and seeing feathers scattered everywhere. My first thought is usually the worst- has a predator broken into the coop and attacked my chickens? Luckily, I haven’t ever lost any of my chickens to a predator and their feather loss is normally something much less serious… Continue Reading

Chicken Jokes Community

Ridding the Chickens of Hitchhikers

Well it’s my turn to deal with poultry mites!  This is a new problem for me, so after much research on how to rid my flock of parasites, this article by the Chicken Chick was the one I chose for my game plan. Great information and easy to follow instructions.

When I noticed one of my Silkies having feather loss, at first I just assumed she was molting. However, it was obvious after time passed that she was not following the ordinary sequence of feather loss. The tip off was her vent area looking irritated, which suggests she might have mites. Although I couldn’t really see any  signs of cooties, her feathers are dull, she’s feather pulling, and picking at herself.

Last night I treated all the birds, the coop, the coop area, and changed bedding. I was lucky, yesterday the temperature was only 100, at least I was able to work without sweating to death. Hopefully those 115 days are over now that we’re in the monsoon season.

The joys of chicken keeping isn’t always joy, sometimes we just have to accept the unpleasant stuff, take the good along with the bad, laugh, and sometimes even cry. It’s all a part of owning chickens!