Updating a Wordpress Theme, Brace Yourself for a Challenge

Know What your Getting Into Before you Take the Plunge
Help with Editing & Formatting Published Posts

If you think it’s as easy as pushing a button, you’re probably going to be disappointed. Especially if you have years of posts. Even more so if you’ve applied formatting of any kind to your entries… Read Article on my other blog for information on how to edit posts for a smoother transition.

From the Farm

Meet Lucy, my 2 year old Australorpe hen. This breed is an asset to any flock, they are docile, friendly, and good egg layers. In the bright sun her shinny black feathers have a blue tint that is stunning.

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New Chicken Keeping Articles | June 20, 2015

A collection of chicken keeping articles from across the web archived in one convenient library on our menu bar.

June 20, 2015
11 Reasons to Keep Backyard Chickens – Urban Farm.
A Chicken Coop Remodel | Backyard Poultry Magazine.
5 Ways to Make Coop-Cleaning Easier – Hobby Farms.
7 Tips to Prevent Respiratory Infection in Poultry – Hobby Farms.
Chicken Quarters: 5 Ways to Spruce Up an Aging Coop – Urban Farm.
Chicken Quarters: My Hens Are Laying Fewer Eggs—What Should I Do? – Urban Farm.

Worried about your chickens in the hot weather? Read Article on how to help them beat the heat. With these helpful tips you can be sure you’ve done all you can to make them comfortable.

Backyard Biosecurity, Healthy Chicken Keeping

Backyard biosecurity means doing everything you can to protect your birds from disease. As a bird owner, keeping your birds healthy is a top priority. Your birds can become sick or die from exposure to just a few unseen bacteria, viruses,or parasites. In a single day, these germs can multiply and infect all your birds. However, by practicing backyard biosecurity, you can keep your birds healthy.
If you follow these basic tips and make them part of your routine, you decrease the risk of disease entering your flock and persisting in soil, droppings, and debris. Practicing biosecurity is an investment in the health of your birds.

When You Suspect Disease

Do not wait to report unusual signs of disease or unexpected deaths among your birds. Call your agricultural extension agent, local veterinarian, the State Veterinarian, or U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Veterinary Services office.
USDA operates a toll-free hotline: (1–866–536–7593) with veterinarians to help you. USDA wants to test sick birds to make sure they do not have a serious poultry disease.

There is no charge for USDA veterinarians to work with you to conduct a disease investigation. Early reporting is important to protecting the health of your birds!

Disinfect

Cleaning and disinfecting is one of the most important steps you can take in practicing backyard biosecurity.
Below are some examples of disinfectants available on the market. Follow the directions on the label carefully for the best results.Thoroughly clean and scrub objects before applying
disinfectants. Disinfectants cannot work on top of caked-on dirt and manure, so thoroughly wash surfaces before disinfecting.
Apply disinfectants using brushes, sponges and spray units. Allow adequate contact time (follow manufacturer’s instructions.)
Dispose of used disinfectant according to local regulations.

Examples of Disinfectants

• Roccal®: Mix 1/2 fluid oz of Roccal per gallon of water.
• Nolvasan® (chlorhexidine diacetate 2 percent): Mix
• 3 fluid oz of Nolvasan per gallon of water.
• Household bleach (sodium hypochlorite 6 percent):
• Mix 3/4 cup of household bleach per gallon of water.
• Lysol® spray for footwear
• Purell® hand pump for hand disinfection

Source: United States Dept. of Agriculture, USDA  http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs
Photo: Wikipedia