Identifying Chicken Predators by the Individual Evidence They Leave Behind

 

Six Common Predators and the Clues Left Behind After an Attack

1024px-Coyote_in_Lincoln_Park

Coyote

Coyotes will either tunnel or muscle their way into a coop. They’re smart, staking out the premises first to learn when the ideal time is to attack. A coyote is most likely to be seen at dawn and dusk, however, broad daylight attacks are not unheard of. Keep in mind coyotes are very active at night, and they can easily scale a 6 foot fence. When a coyote gains access to a chicken coop they’re known to kill all the birds, then taking a couple with them.
Signs a Coyote Leaves Behind After an Attack

• Birds missing
• Necks broken
Feathers scattered everywhere in coop

Urocyon_cinereoargenteus

Fox

Clever as a fox, a saying we’ve all heard, and it couldn’t be more true. They climb better than you could ever imagine and can dig their way into a coop with ease.  Fox are smart and patient, they will watch your coop for weeks before they attack.
Every bird the fox can grab in the coop will be killed, often the entire flock will be completely wiped out.
They’ll take as many birds from coop they can with them.
Signs a Fox Leaves Behind After an Attack
Many birds missing
• Feathers sprawled in the coop AND away from the coop
• Broken necks

800px-Raccoon_climbing_in_tree_-_Cropped_and_color_corrected

Raccoon

These smart egg stealing masked burglars leave significant evidence of their presence.  A raccoon rips open the crop and sometimes the breast to feast. You’ll find all the chickens still in the coop as a rule because coons have difficulty carrying them off.
One of the raccoon’s most distinctive features are their extremely dexterous front paws, in other words, they’re extremely talented at opening door latches!
Signs a Raccoon Leaves Behind After an Attack
Rips open the crop and sometimes the breast.
• Dead chickens will most likely be left in the coop.

800px-Opossum_2

Opossum

This little critter is after your chicks and eggs. That’s his primary agenda, but it may go after a small adult chicken at times. The opossum gains access usually through a small opening in the coop.
Signs an Opossum Leaves Behind After an Attack
• Doesn’t take birds from the coop.
• Tears open the abdomen.
Interesting Fact:
The opossum is a Marsupial.  The adult females have a marsupium, or pouch where they keep their young while they grow up. Cool!

The Enemy, Resident Harris Hawk

Hawk

These predators usually attack when chickens are free roaming during the day. Hawks, like the fox and coyote are well prepared for their attack by staking out the premises beforehand.
There’s no mistaking the evidence of a chicken attacked by a hawk, the signs are quite different from all other predators.  Sharp talons and beaks are extremely effective in killing or injuring multiple birds.
Signs the Hawk Leaves Behind After an Attack
• Some birds will be missing.

• Some injured birds will appear to be cut up.
• Injuries look as though chickens were stabbed with a knife.

800px-Bubo_virginianus_06

Owl

Owls attack  similar to the Hawk. They also stake out the potential of meal by watching the chickens for a spell before they attack.

Hawk or Owl? It’s not entirely impossible to tell the difference between a hawk and owl attack. Raptors usually poop when they kill, fortunately the poop of an owl and hawk are slightly different. You’ll find their poop near the feathers of the victim.
Owl: White streak with clumps
Hawk: Just a white streak
Signs an Owl Leaves Behind After an Attack
• Neck and head eaten.
• Deep knife looking cuts on the abdomen.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Advertisements

About tbnranch

amy elizabeth, writer, author, antique dealer. Lives in the northeastern reaches of the Sonoran Desert on a small hobby farm.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Managing the Flock and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.