Brooder Shed for Silkies and Hatchlings

Finally! This is my finished brooder shed with a custom built brooder box for my Silkie hens and their hatchlings. The shed is 8×10, it was just a bare bones structure with a window, double doors, and two sidewall vents. Today it has vinyl flooring, electric, insulation & drywall, overhead lighting and is temperature controlled.

All my Silkies live primarily in the chicken coop. However, now when a hen becomes *broody she’ll be moved to the brooder shed where she’ll sit on fertile eggs until they hatch. The chicks will then stay with the hen until they’re sold… or moved to their own chicken yard when fully feathered to be later sold as *point of lay pullets.

 

Broody:  When the hen has an urge to sit on her eggs to try and hatch them.
Point of Lay Pullet: Young female chicken just about to lay,  5-6 months old.

 

A Tip on Keeping a Hen with Eggs or Chicks Safe Among the Flock

It’s best to keep a hen with fertile eggs under her in a separate place, but that’s not always possible. Personally, I like to keep my birds together, so this box is a nice solution. I found this pic somewhere and saved it so I could incorporate the idea in my own coop.

Brooder Box Inside the Coop

Why is this Box Important?

1.  Sometimes other hens can disturb a nest of fertile eggs causing them to break.
2. Other hens may quit laying if they are discouraged to enter the community nest area by a hen with eggs under her.
3. Newly hatched chicks may get injured or even killed by other members of the flock.

I like having the wire top hinged. It’s nice and super easy to move a broody hen from the community nest area and have the option to close the lid as hatch day approaches.