Breed Focus: The Chantecler

The Chantecler originated in the Quebec Province of Canada and is a fine example of a dual-purpose breed. Brother Wilfred Chatelain first thought of the idea for the Chantecler when he was walking through the Oka Agricultural Institute’s poultry flocks, in Quebec, and realized there was no breed of chicken from Canada; all of the breeds being used in Canada originated in Europe or America. He wanted to create a breed of chicken that could stand the harsh climate of Canada, and that could be used for both egg and meat production. Continue Reading

If your’re interested in adding the Chantecler to your flock, My Pet Chicken occasionally has this breed.

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Source: Livestock Conservancy

 

21 Day Chart of the Development of a Chick

Embryo Chick

Hens Who Eat Their Eggs

Gavin Flock

A chicken who eats eggs from the nest is not a common problem, but it does exist. For obvious reasons this is a bad habit that needs to be addressed ASAP. If you don’t, the other members of the flock will soon be helping themselves to the goodies too.

There are a few things to try, but in my opinion they all take too long and there’s no time to waste. Chicken training has a rather poor success rate so let’s forget that too.  What chickens are capable of is making choices, they know what they like and what they don’t.

We already know they like what’s inside fresh eggs, the trick is to change what they like into something they HATE. How?

Take a thumb tack and poke a little hole at each end of a fresh egg. Blow at one end of the egg until it’s empty, then squeeze yellow mustard into the egg and place it in the nest.

Chickens hate mustard, once they find it in an egg it will become something to avoid.  Just make sure you stay on top of egg collection for a few days.

For the less determined chicken, removing all the hay or bedding from the nest is sometimes enough to discourage egg eating. An egg that rolls is harder for them to peck at, and often just not worth the effort.

Try one way, try the other, or try them both at the same time, just nip this problem in the butt before it becomes a bigger one.

What Are Egg Grades?

There are three consumer grades for eggs: U.S. Grade AA, A, and B. The grade is determined by the interior quality of the egg and the appearance and condition of the egg shell. Eggs of any quality grade may differ in weight (size).

U.S. Grade AA eggs have whites that are thick and firm; yolks that are high, round, and practically free from defects; and clean, unbroken shells. Grade AA and Grade A eggs are best for frying and poaching where appearance is important.

U.S. Grade A eggs have characteristics of Grade AA eggs except that the whites are “reasonably” firm. This is the quality most often sold in stores.

U.S. Grade B eggs have whites that may be thinner and yolks that may be wider and flatter than eggs of higher grades. The shells must be unbroken, but may show slight stains. This quality is seldom found in retail stores because they are usually used to make liquid, frozen, and dried egg products.

Sizing of Eggs
Size tells you the minimum required net weight per dozen eggs. It does not refer to the dimensions of an egg or how big it looks. While some eggs in the carton may look slightly larger or smaller than the rest, it is the total weight of the dozen eggs that puts them in one of the following classes:

Jumbo         30 ounces
Extra Large  27 ounces
Large           24 ounces
Medium       21 ounces
Small          18 ounces
Peewee       15 ounces

Source: United States Dept. of Agriculture, USDA
Food Safety and Inspection Service