About the Welsummer

The Welsummer rooster is rustic-red and orange in color and the hen is a light and dark brown partridge pattern with gold around the neck area.  This dual purpose large fowl lays  large terracotta dark brown eggs, often with speckles. Expect about 160 eggs per year.

800px-welsummer_hen

Features & Color Variations

Single comb, medium wattles, broad chest and back, wide full tail, and 4 toes.  There are three variations of the standard Welsummer, Partridge, Silver Duckwing and the Gold Duckwing. Recognized Varieties: Red Partridge
Behavior
Welsummers are friendly and intelligent, but not considered especially docile. They generally confine well, but prefer to forage. Setter/broody: yes.
Bantams
The Welsummer Bantam lays light brown eggs, and their production is slightly higher than the standard at about 180 eggs per year. Bantams exist in both Partridge and Silver Duckwing colors but are rare

  • Origin: Netherlands
  • Class: Continental
  • Type: Large Fowl
  • Size: Medium (6-7 lbs)
  • Rarity: Common
  • Purpose: Dual
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Breed Focus, About the Australorp

The Australorp is a great choice if your looking for an excellent layer of large brown eggs. Expect approximately five eggs per week from this *dual purpose bird. Their color is black, weight at maturity is 7-8 pounds, they are docile, friendly, and considered shy.

australorp-hen

About the Australorp

  • Single Comb
  • 4 Toes
  • Broody/Setter
  • Confines Well
  • Average, 260 Eggs Yearly
  • Cold Hardy
  • Class: English • Rarity: Common

The Australorp is of Australian origin, developed as a utility breed with a focus on egg laying. It achieved world wide popularity in the 1920s after the breed broke numerous world records for number of eggs laid. The most popular color is black, which is the only color recognized in the United States. However, blue and white are also recognized in its home country. South Africa recognizes buff, splash, wheaten laced and golden as well.

The Australorp is a great starter bird if your new to chicken keeping. The chicks are hardy and very easy to raise.
* Dual Purpose: provides 2 kinds of resources, meat & eggs.

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Introducing Hatch-a-Long Chicks to the Flock

Mamma hen was separated from the flock five weeks ago to hatch and raise her baby chicks in a quiet and safe environment.  The chicks are now two weeks old and it’s time to move Mamma and her babies back to the coop. To keep harmony among the flock, I’ve closed off a corner with hardware cloth to allow visibility between existing flock, Mamma and babies. The frame is merely PVC pipe cut in 3 foot sections with wire attached using zip ties.

Here’s the set-up I’m using from Nursery to Coop…

Moving the hen with her chicks is best done at night when all the birds are sleeping. Last night wearing my handy head lamp, I headed out to the nursery coop. Throwing a blanket over the nest, I took Mom and her chicks, nest box and all, and placed it in the designated transition pen inside the coop. Come morning it will be introduction time! Safe, peaceful, and everybody is happy.

After a week or so, I’ll allow Mamma to take her babies out of the enclosure.  She will protect her babies from the existing flock, and at about five weeks, she will begin putting distance between her and them.

Silkie and Chicks 51016

Note:
Many chicken keepers allow their hens to hatch their eggs in a secluded area within the chicken coop. Others move hen and eggs back to coop three or four days before the hatch, both ways are certainly okay. I just like to give my hens a quiet place to do their mothering, it’s merely a personal preference.

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