About the Marans

The Marans originated in Marans, France, and were imported into the United Kingdom in the 1930s.
The hens lay on average around 150–210 dark brown eggs per year.  Marans are considered a dual-purpose bird, meaning they’re appreciated for their eggs and table qualities.

Recognized Colors:
White, Wheaten, Black Copper.
Not recognized:
Birchen, Blue, Salmon, Blue Silver Salmon, Silver Cuckoo, and Golden Cuckoo.

Egg Laying Facts

Expect an average of 3-4 eggs per week.
Color: Dark brown/or chocolate
Size: Large

About

Class: Continental (French)
Size: Heavy, 7-8 pounds
Type: Large Fowl & Bantam

Features:
Comb Type: Single
Number of Toes: 4
Crested: No
Feathered Legs: In the United States, mostly no

Suitability
The Marans are cold hardy birds, but not especially heat tolerant.
Broody: Yes / Average
Personality: Varies, however, generally docile, very active.

Interesting Fact: Cuckoo Marans hens can be mated with an unbarred cock to produce sex-linked hybrid offspring.

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Broody Hens, Behavior and How to Handle It

  • Need a Better Understanding of the Broody Hen?
  • Here’s a Couple Articles That will Help you Address this Behavior
  • Definition of Broody: A hen with strong instincts to hatch eggs, whether or not they are fertile, or even present in the nest.

The Signs of a Broody Hen

Your hen won’t leave the nest, appears to not be eating, her feathers are all fluffed up, she’s pale, and lethargic. These are classic signs of the broody hen. First of all she isn’t starving, she is eating and drinking, but it’s low on her list of priorities… Read Article

More…
What is a Broody Hen and How to Deal With It McMurray Hatchery Blog

Chicken Breeds with Broody Tendencies

If you are only interested in egg production than you may not want to purchase chicks that have broody tendencies.  Broody hens can be troublesome, so if your not looking for a mother hen, here are the breeds you may want to avoid… Read Article

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Do I Need a Rooster for Hens to Lay Eggs?

Let’s take a look at the Rooster’s role in the flock…

I am always surprised when I’m asked this question. I suppose it’s a logical question for those not too familiar with poultry.
Do I need a Rooster for hens to lay eggs?
A rooster does serve a couple of useful purposes to the flock which can be a good thing for the hens and keeper alike.

Read Article

Rooster

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