The Beginner’s Guide to Incubation

  • This guide is intended to help people new to incubation learn how to properly incubate and hatch eggs.
  • It will walk you through how to incubate and hatch most common types of poultry, such as chickens, ducks, turkeys, geese, etc.  Read Article
by: Backyard Chickens
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Introducing Chickens to an Existing Flock

Tips to Help Minimize the Drama

Haven’t ever brought new chickens to an existing flock? Well, this can be an experience you won’t forget any time soon.
Best to understand the pecking order now before you learn the hard way… Continue Reading

Step by Step Process of Introducing a New Chicken to an Existing Semi-Confined Flock

Anybody who raises chickens knows the drama of adding a new bird… and that’s where I am now.  My 2014 Silkie chicks have been in plain sight of an established flock since they were 7 weeks old. Does that mean they’ll all get along? Heck no! Continue Reading

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Taking Chicken Keeping a Step Further, Candling Eggs

Are you still in the dark about candling eggs?  This article will walk you through it with descriptive and detailed pics. Or, you can be lazy like me and just wait to see if your eggs hatch!
These informative articles will help you better understanding of candling eggs.

by Jono’s Urban Farm

So you’ve got chooks and a rooster and you want some chicks. But how do you know if the rooster is doing his job? The way to check eggs to see if they are fertile is called “candling”. 

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More Help

Candling Eggs Progression Through Incubation :
There are some particular detailed signs to look for at all stages of growth

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Disinfecting Your Coop, Here’s How

Given your Coop a Thorough Cleaning Lately?

Disinfecting your coop is a crucial step which the small flock owner might normally overlook. Disinfectants should be applied only after the building and equipment have been thoroughly cleaned, ideally right after rinsing. Disinfectants can be applied by sprays, aerosols or fumigation.

Don’t be intimidated by the thought of “fumigating” your hen house: for most small flock facilities, using a garden type sprayer is the easiest method, and chances are you already have a suitable disinfectant around the house. The types of disinfectants generally used are phenolic compounds (e.g., Pine-sol, One Stroke, Osyl),  iodine or iodophors, (e.g., Betadine and Weladol), chlorine compounds (e.g., Clorox, generic bleach), quaternary ammonium compound (e.g., Roccal D Plus) and oxidizing compounds (e.g., Virkon S, Oxy-Sept 333).

Follow the manufacturer’s directions for mixing and dilution of these disinfectants.  A good rule of thumb is to apply at the rate of one gallon of diluted disinfectant per 150-200 square feet of surface area. For a more thorough disinfecting, soak waterers and feeders in a 200 ppm chlorine solution (1 tablespoon chlorine bleach per gallon of boiling water).

Source:  Cornell University | Small Farms Program

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