From Egg to Brooder, When to Move Chicks

From egg incubator to brooder / How to move a chick from one to the other safely. Read Article

Source: Raising Happy Chickens

Pecking Chicks
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Brooder Shed Update

For the past year, maybe longer, we have been remodeling the brooder shed to be a more suitable place to raise baby chicks. This will also be where my broody Silkie Bantam hens can hatch eggs. Over the winter we had drywall put up, and this past week it was taped and prepped to paint. The brooder itself has been built, but there’s still a box of flooring to install on the bottom.

I bought paint the other day for the interior of the shed, pale yellow of course! Next week painting is the number one priority.  It’s been fun picking out prints for wall decor, mostly retro poultry tin, but I did choose two framed prints of fancy hens and roosters.

The biggest problem with raising chickens here is the hot weather. It’s impossible to tell a hen when to go broody, and of course they pick the worst time on their own. So I’ve solved that problem with a heating and cooling system in the brooder shed itself. However, that means the pressure is on to produce really nice quality birds. Air conditioning is going to drive my prices up a little to accommodate the price of keeping them alive in 115 degree temperatures. But, that also means I’ll have chicks during the off season when they’re not readily available at local retailers.

There’s still an incubator to buy just in case a hen decides to leave her eggs. They do that sometimes! One day they are dedicated mothers sitting on a clutch of fertile eggs, and then just like that, decide to re-join the flock, leaving their babies to die. What the heck!

So little by little it’s all getting done, but it all cost money, and unfortunately the money tree I planted has not produced even a single dime. Dang!

Here’s what the brooder shed and new brooder looks like so far…

Still lots to do, but I don’t think a month to completion is unrealistic. 🙂

Best Classroom Incubator and Brooder Kit

If you’re looking for the best COMPLETE kit for hatching baby chicks in the classroom, this is it. The key to an enjoyable experience is being prepared with the proper set-up. This incubator and brooder kit is from a reputable company who will stand by their product.

You can also expect a friendly and knowledgeable staff that will be happy to help you with ANY questions you might have along the way.

Order the kit first, then ask a Murray McMurray  representative about how and when to order hatching eggs. It’s that easy!

Note: Make sure you’ve arranged a place for your chicks to go once they’ve hatched. Craig’s list in ‘Farm & Garden’ is the best place to re-home baby chicks. They’ll probably go fast if you price them at $3.00 ea. Remember what breed they are, that will be important to many chicken keepers.

Everything you will need to incubate, hatch and brood, plus a book and a poster are included in this kit. You will receive:

  • 1) Full View Picture Window Incubator includes: electronic thermostat, fan and automatic egg turner.
  • 2) The book Guide to Better Hatching.
  • 3) Candling Device used to check the progress of development.
  • 4) Brooder – After the birds are dry from hatching use the accompanying brooder to continue the healthy growth of chicks. This brooder is made of heavy galvanized wire mesh, wire floor and approx 1 1/2” to 2″ deep set-in plastic tray. There are clips on the side of the cage for easy removal and cleaning of the bottom pan. The brooder is to be used in a room that is approximately 70 degrees with no direct drafts. The brooder holds 30 chicks for up to 10 days. It is easily assembled. The brooder kit includes:
    • (a) Brooder Cage measuring 30” W x 18” L x 18” H.
    • (B) Plastic poultry Waterer.
    • (c) Snap on Feeder.
    • (d) 5 lbs. of Chick Feed, 1 lb. Grit. and 4oz Quik Chik
    • (e) Single Bulb Brooder Lamp with Infra-Red Heat Bulb
    • (f) Brooder Thermometer

    Order the Classroom Incubator and Brooder Kit at Murray McMurray Hatchery