Chicks Arriving Tomorrow, This is our Brooder Set-up

Brooder Shed is Ready to Go!
Here’s a few pics of my set-up where the chicks will live for the next 5 to 7 weeks. Depending on their growth, the weather, and most important, when they are mostly feathered. Usually they are feathered for sure by 8 weeks, but usually the temperatures in Phoenix allow us to move them from the brooder to coop earlier. What kind of chicks? Guess you’ll have to wait and see!
The Brooder Set-up
My husband built this custom brooder complete with electric and self closing doors on top. The floor in the brooder is lined with textured linoleum tiles and the windows are plexiglass.  There’s plenty of storage cabinets below for all those chick rearing necessities.
I use radiant heat,  but have two 50 watt back-up heat lamps overhead just in case of a sudden drop in outside temp. I also have a temperature reading from the brooder to house, so I don’t have to wonder if they are too cold or hot.

The Brooder Shed below is 8×10, heavily insulated, then drywall, and I had the gruesome chore of painting the inside pale yellow, ( I hate painting.) There is power, but no plumbing. Fortunately the hose is only steps away.

I’ll be picking up the chicks across town, I found this handy cage at Goodwill for $1.99, can’t beat that! It will comfortably hold at least 18 chicks. They like to be transported tightly packed together, it helps keep them warm and feeling safe.

Back to TBN Ranch Chicken Keeping Resources HOME PAGE

Controlling Brooder Temperature in Fall Weather

There’s no need to keep chicks inside your house, your chicks will fair quite well in cooler temperatures, but there are a few important rules to follow… Read Article

TBN Chicken Keeping Resources HOME PAGE

DIY Brooder Using a Plastic Tote

Clever DIY  brooder for chicks, great for the small scale chicken keeper. Just remember they’ll outgrow this space fast, so you’ll need to prepare before the coop housing for your juveniles.
It would also be nice to have this brooder on hand for isolating chick/s that have an unexpected health issue.

My Two Cents | TBN Ranch

Liked the idea of the drinker on pellets, however, didn’t like seeing a white light in the brooder lamp.  In my opinion, always use a red bulb, chicks are easily agitated by bright lights and this can lead to behavior problems. The radiant heat shown in video is a superior alternative!

Thanks Gail for sharing with us!

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