New Chicken Keeping Articles | January 10, 2016

Articles for Chicken Keepers, by Chicken Keepers is an updated weekly collection of chicken keeping articles from across the web archived in one convenient library on our menu bar.
Have an article to submit? Send it to amyichi@yahoo.com with ARTICLE SUBMISSION on the subject line.

January 10, 2016
6 Tools Every Chicken Keeper Needs – Hobby Farms
Why Some Chickens Molt Faster Than Others | Garden Betty
Chicken Breed Focus – Japanese Bantam
How Much Should I Feed My Chickens? | Backyard Poultry Magazine
Chicken Quarters: The Danger In Heating The Chicken Coop – Urban Farm
7 Signs You’re Ready To Raise City Chickens – Urban Farm
7 Ways to Keep Mice and Rats Out of the Coop – Hobby Farms
Why Transylvanian Chickens Have Naked Necks

Adding Chickens 2

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New Chicken Keeping Articles | Ocotober 22, 2015

Articles for Chicken Keepers, by Chicken Keepers is an updated weekly collection of chicken keeping articles from across the web archived in one convenient library on our menu bar.
Have an article to submit? Send it to amyichi@yahoo.com with ARTICLE SUBMISSION on the subject line.

October 22, 2015 | Archives
Chicken Breed Focus – Ancona
The Chicken Chick®: Surviving Winter with Chickens
All You Need To Know About Chickens Molting
How To Raise Free Range Chickens | Backyard Poultry Magazine
Molting: It’s That Time Again
The Prescription Gardener: 9 Natural De-Worming Plants for Your Backyard Flock – Hobby Farms
Germany says ‘no more chick shredding’ | Animals Australia
To Heat or not to Heat your Coop this Winter | Fresh Eggs Daily®

Feature Article | About the Leghorn Chicken

by Pickin’ a Chicken

Another incredibly common chicken, that is found in many varieties, with the most common, and famous being the White. They are the primary white egg producer of the world, and will be the source of what you pick up in the supermarket. Especially the Pearl-White variety (pictured) are very regal looking, and would be a nice addition to your flock in more ways than one. CONTINUE READING

Predator Solution? Does the Nite Guard® Solar Work?

nite guard

Need protection for your chickens against nighttime predators? I have 7 Nite Guard Solar® boxes on my property to help keep my flock safe.  I know it seems like silly gadget, but I must say, I haven’t had any incidents with predators since using them. They’ve been in use for two years now, all still working great.  They’re just under $20 on Amazon.

All About Molting

amy elizabeth | TBN Ranch

Every year your chickens will molt, in other words, lose their feathers and grow new ones. Unfortunately, it also means most hens will not lay eggs until their molt cycle is done. However, there are exceptions to that rule. There are hens whose rate of lay is not affected, but you can expect their molt time to last longer… CONTINUE READING

All About Molting

All About Molting

An Informative Article on Why,When, and How Molting Affects a Hen’s Egg Production.

All About Molting

Every year your chickens will molt, in other words, lose their feathers and grow new ones. Unfortunately, it also means most hens will not lay eggs until their molt cycle is done. However, there are exceptions to that rule. There are hens whose rate of lay is not affected, but you can expect their molt time to last longer.

Late molters will lay eggs 12 to 14 months before they molt, and early molters might begin to molt after only a few months after their point of lay. Late molting is preferred; those birds usually have a more ragged feather appearance, but will generally be your better laying hens.  Early molters are just the opposite; they have a smooth and tidy appearance, but are usually poor layers.

Late molters will lay eggs longer before molting, and within 2 to 3 months will have completely shed their feathers. Their loss of feathers are replaced at the same time, this means a hen will return to full production quicker. Early molters lose their feathers just a few at a time and will drag out the molting process for as long as 4 to 6 months. These hens will generally be the poor producers in your flock.

There is a definite order in which feathers are lost, so it gives you a general idea of what molting stage they’re in.  Chickens lose their head feathers first, then those on the neck, breast, body, wings, and the tail is last.

Here in Phoenix, the molt season begins in early September and I’ll be raking up feathers all the way through October. The particular time of year your birds will molt depends on the climate of your geographic region.  Wherever you live, your chickens will not so subtly inform you when you can expect this yearly process to occur.

Note: A little crimped or rolled oats added to your chicken’s diet during molting may assist in feather growth.