Brinsea mini advance incubator hatching photos

Is the Brinsea Mini Advance incubator a good choice? Here’s your answer… 🙂

My Tiny Brood of Backyard Chooks

The first time I used my incubator, I had a complete failure (problem was with the eggs, not the incubator). This time I had five eggs hatch out of six.

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When I got home from work there was one chick hatched and another two hatched shortly after. (I think the second two waited for me to get home so I could watch them.)

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Then another one pipped. You can see the little egg tooth peeping out.

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Then it zipped it’s way around the egg.

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Then it pushed on the shell to make enough room to get out.

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Hello world.

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Exhausted and time for a sleep. After all, the pip did start at 7pm and the chick greeted us at 1:30am. Ah, hrrm, yes, well I did sit up watching the whole time. It was my first hatch after all. One of the previous chicks pipped, zipped and greeted us all within 20 minutes…

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What happens at a poultry show?

Jim Vyse Arks Chicken Chat

prize_poultryLast week we talked about how to prepare your ducks for a poultry show. This week we’re going to tell you what happens at a poultry show and what you can expect when you’re there.

There are many different types of show that are all regulated and structured by the Poultry Club of Great Britain. You can find out more information about the types of show on the Poultry Club of Great Britain website.

Transporting your birds

The Poultry Club of Great Britain gives the following information in their welfare guidelines for transporting your birds:

Cardboard boxes:

“Ideally one for each bird and sufficiently large for the bird to stand up and turn around: put newspaper then a layer of shavings in the base.

Use stout boxes, make ventilation holes by making two parallel cuts about 1” (2.5cm) apart across at least two corners and push the centre section…

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A Nest All Her Own

This is Rose, she’s the only hen of the black Silkies that isn’t broody right now. She was laying that egg while I photographed her this morning. For a change, she had first pic of any nest she wanted, all the others were on their own mission…

The rest of the ladies are busy sitting on NOTHING. Regardless, they’ll stay put for the next three weeks as if they had fertile eggs under them… just because that’s what Silkies do!  They’re dedicated to mothering no matter what, even if it’s just pretend.

 

Preparing The Chicken Coop And Garden For Winter

Old World Garden Farms

As the last of the leaves turn and begin to fall to the ground – one thing is for sure – Winter is just around the corner!

The Chicken Coop is surrounded by snow - but keeping our chickens safely out of the elements.  Needless to say - they want no part of being outside right now. Winter brings snow, cold and wind to the farm – but with  a few simple preparations to the coop – our chickens stay comfortable.

And with that in mind – we will spend this weekend getting the garden and chicken coop ready for “old man winter’s” arrival in the coming months.

Preparing the Chickens…

One of our most important “winterizing” chores is preparing our coop to handle the cold and windy temperatures we can face here in Ohio.

The key to keeping the chickens healthy through the cold winter months is really quite simple.  Chickens are bothered more by damp and drafty conditions than the actual cold temperatures of winter – and if you can keep the coop dry and free of chilling…

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