Cookie and Piper’s Story

Meet Cookie, she is a 2 year old Buff Silkie Bantam… and our little mother hen. She is the one girl I can count on to set on fertile eggs and NEVER give up until they hatch. Don’t let her size fool you, she runs the coop, the flock knows better than to mess with her, the eggs, or her chicks. She weighs only about 1.5 pounds, and has chosen her one and only friend to be Piper, a 8.5 pound Standard Cochin.

I’ve mentioned in the past that it’s a good idea to have your flock members all about the same size and weight to minimize bickering. It’s not a rule, only a precaution. You just never know if the pecking order ritual is going to be a peaceful one, or a war zone. In this case, we have a peaceful friendship… but not without rank.

Cookie was the only survivor of five mail order chicks in 2016. I didn’t want her in the brooder all alone so I went to every local feed store in hopes of finding baby chicks to put in with her. No luck finding chicks 2-3 days old, all I could find were week old Standard Cochins. Here we go with size again… these chicks were way too big. Having zero choice, I took a chance the twice her size Cochins wouldn’t pick on this frail little Silkie.  They didn’t, just the usual drama. When night came and the cold set in, they all huddled together and all was forgotten. Whew!

I sold all the Cochins when they reached 4 months old, except Piper. I guess Cookie never forget that without Piper, she may not have survived.

 

About the Standard Cochin Chicken

The Gentle Giants

Cochin chickens are known for their soft feathers and fluffy robust appearance. They have a round body, long silky plumage, feathered feet, and a single comb. They lay a fair number of brown or tinted small to medium eggs. You can expect approximately 2 eggs per week.

This breed may not be a prolific layer, but are still quite worthy for their broody tendencies, and their stunning appearance of course! They’re often used to hatch fertile eggs from other birds, however, don’t be in a big hurry, the Cochin is very slow to mature.

If your looking for a docile, peaceful, friendly, and easily handled breed, this buxom beauty is for you.

I find Cochins don’t fancy scratching around in the dirt as much as most other breeds. They are also not a fan of high perches. They prefer free roam, but confine quite well.

They’re considered a heavy breed weighing in at about 11 lbs for roosters, and 8 to 8.5 lbs. for hens.
Bantams: A hen will be just under 2 lbs. and the rooster, about 2 lbs.

The Cochin chicken breed arrived on the shores of Britain and America from the port of Shanghai, China in the mid 1800s.  This fancy breed has a wide variety of colorful outfits, in buff, white, black, blue, partridge and cuckoo.

 

 

Curious Hen Poses for the Camera

Meet Cookie, a young hen full of character. She’s at the bottom of the pecking order, with only one friend in the flock, Piper.  Poor Cookie.

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Piper, a Standard Silver Laced Cochin Hen

Cochin and Silkie Pullet 32016

Welcome Hatch-A-Longs

Yesterday was hatch day. My usual redundant morning chores were certainly more exciting to say the least when I was greeted by newly hatched fuzzy butts. This was a first time hatching eggs for Peaches, a four year old Silkie hen.  She’s very proud and protective of her babies, nevertheless, I’m keeping a close watch on her inexperienced mothering. The brooder is set up and ready to go if needed.

This was a trial run for Peaches, the fertile eggs I placed under her were a barnyard mix. What I know for sure is the eggs are from a Leghorn and an Ameraucana. But the rooster? That will remain a mystery.

It will be nice change to have birds other than Silkies and Cochins in my barn, these little hatch-a-longs will remain here as permanent members of the flock. Mamma and chicks will be moved to the barn with the others, confined to a corner in full view of the flock at 2-3 weeks old.

2016 Hatch 500 428162016 Hatch 2 800 42816

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So Cute!

New Articles for Chicken Keepers | March 26, 2016

Articles for Chicken Keepers, by Chicken Keepers is an updated collection of chicken keeping articles from across the web archived in one convenient library on our menu bar.
Have an article to submit? Send it to amyichi@yahoo.com with ARTICLE SUBMISSION on the subject line.

New Articles | March 25, 2016
How Old is the Average Supermarket Egg? | Fresh Eggs Daily®
Cooking Eggs For Chickens | Backyard Poultry Magazine
Chicken Wire or Hardware Cloth for Coops – Timber Creek Farm
Secrets To Predator-Proofing Your Chicken Coop | Off The Grid News
Sick Chickens? Spot the Symptoms [Infographic] – Hobby Farms
Fox Deterrent | Nite Guard
Dominique Chickens: Heritage Poultry Breeds
Delaware | Whitmore Farm   About the Delaware Chicken
Barred Plymouth Rock Will Rock Your Flock – The Fowl Blog
How to Get Rid of Your Chickens’ External Parasites – For Dummies

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What’s New at TBN Ranch
Below is one of two coops that has been predator proofed, I’m confident there’s no chance of any predator ever getting inside. My once not so handy husband is turning into quite a hand! He’s not much into the chickens, but he was pretty upset about the coyote attack and this is what he did for our feathered family members. Coop is now raised 21″ high, and and has a solid wood floor. I dare even a tiny sparrow to find entry!

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This coop is where chicks go after they leave the brooder, they’ll stay here until they’re ready to join the flock at about four months old.

Piper and Cookie, a Standard Cochin and Buff Silkie are the only youngsters who survived the predator ordeal three weeks ago. They are from my Fall 2015 chicks, and although integrated into the existing flock, still stick together as best pals. So happy they still have each other. They’re inseparable, they even lay their eggs together!

I’ve said in the past to keep flock members that are all about the same size to minimize bullying… but I’m kinda sorta changing my mind about that. Piper is close to seven pounds and Cookie is barely a pound, no problems with the other lightweights in the flock either. However, let’s just say it’s always a good idea to keep in mind that sometimes size does matter in the chicken world.

Cochin and Silkie Pullet 32016