Best Way to Catch a Chicken

If you’ve ever had to catch a chicken you know it’s not an easy task. Here’s the Simple Way

You probably already know a chicken can run faster than a human, so chasing a bird around like a maniac is going to get you absolutely nowhere. To make it even more difficult, chickens are smart, so any device you’ve used before such as a pole or net, is something they’ll remember immediately, and run.
There’s a simple answer to catching a chicken, the only drawback is you’re going to have to work at night. Wait until your chickens have gone to roost for the evening. Enter the coop wearing a headlamp (keep the beam of light pointed at the ground) hover over the bird and place both hands over the wings so the bird can’t flap around. Then gently remove chicken from the perch. You can wrap a towel around the bird if you’ll be treating medically, or if you just want a bit more security, especially if your handling a rooster.

Chickens are happiest when they’re in a comfortable and predictable environment.  If one of your birds has escaped from the coop, chickens enjoy their freedom for awhile. However, come sundown they will return to the safety of the coop to roost for the night. The rest of the flock will rarely leave the coop at dusk, so it’s a good bet you’re safe to open the coop door for your escapees return.

Remain calm and unhurried, a chicken will easily pick up on your anxiety. You don’t want the bird to be reluctant or fearful to return to the coop. A sparse trail of scratch leading  into the coop might add a bit of helpful incentive.  Keep your distance from the coop door, wait for the bird to join the flock, then approach the coop to close the door.

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5 Different Types of Chicken Coop Heaters

5 Different Types of Chicken Coop Heaters & Our Favorite

Heating the coop has always been a source of endless discussion among chicken folk. Old timers will tell you that you don’t have to heat the coop. However, there are occasions when heat is appropriate.

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Content Contributor: The Happy Chicken Coop
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Coop or Free Roam?

Every good chicken keeper knows the importance of protecting their birds from predators. Most of us will, or already have lost birds to a coyote, hawk, fox, bobcat, etc, etc. It’s devastating to see the after mass, I know, it’s happened here, I lost seven birds after a coyote attack in 2016. That changed everything I loved most about keeping chickens.

Since the attack, my birds have been completely safe after building them a 10×10 predator proof enclosure. Unfortunately, that means their happy life of free roaming our acreage came to a screeching halt. To me, it meant never enjoying my birds out and about, it was now just a chore for their well being. Chickens live for the opportunity to scratch in the dirt and look for bugs, sunbathe in the morning sun, or finding that perfect spot for a dust bath. Since confinement, I’ve noticed the overall health of my flock has not quite been what it was.

The heat plays havoc on confined chickens in the desert southwest, heat stroke is real, and it’s deadly.  Free roam flocks have a much higher rate of survival, and are quite resourceful in finding shade and cooler ground to burrow in.  So this brings me to a dilemma, coop for safety from a predator, or free roam for quality of life and comfort from the extreme heat?

Quality of Life

Today I opened the gate and gave my flock the opportunity to live a happy life. After considering the risk, I decided being cooped up in 110+ would have the same outcome as a predator attack… both could mean a death sentence. I will do my part to protect them every way I can. They will be confined from dusk to late morning, but during the hottest part of the day they will be free to find comfort.
Here’s some of the girls who found a comfy place in the feed room… where there’s a giant oscillating fan and mist system. 🙂

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