Winter Chicken Keeping in Phoenix

Preparing the Chicken Coop for the Colder Months Ahead

The winters are rather mild in Phoenix and your birds will be quite comfortable without heat added, as long as they are protected from wind, drafts, and especially rain.

Temperatures rarely drop below freezing in Phoenix, with the usual overnight temperature in the 4o’s. As long as your birds are kept dry, cool weather is quite welcomed, especially after a long summer of brutal heat.

A heavy weight tarp is suitable protection from wind, along with ample clean pine shavings (preferred) or straw in the coop and nest boxes. Your birds will huddle together for warmth at night, if you stick your finger deep inside their feathers you’ll see they are toasty warm, even at freezing temps.

Never put a heat lamp in your coop, the risk of fire is far to dangerous. I wouldn’t use a light bulb for heat either. First of all, your birds don’t need it in Phoenix, and second, light is annoying and disruptive to the normalcy of nature.

You will hear other chicken keepers say egg laying is reduced or halted completely in the winter months. That may be so in other parts of the country, but in Phoenix I never notice much change in frequency. Remember, the key to keeping the egg basket full is defined in two simple words… happy birds.

Raising Chicks this Winter in Phoenix?

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Winter Chicken Keeping

Here’s some valuable advice from chicken keepers who keep chickens in winter. As a desert dweller, I better leave this subject to the pros! Hope these articles are helpful.

How Cold Is Too Cold For My Chickens? | The Happy Chicken Coop

Here in the North Eastern States, we will be seeing the snow flying soon.By all accounts this year is going to be bad, so we need to prepare ourselves and our flocks for the long months ahead.
Many beginner chicken keepers are amazed at just how hardy and tough chickens are. But still, a common concern is how cold is too cold for my chickens? Continue Reading

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6 Ways to Avoid Frostbite | Hobby Farms

If you live in an area with harsh winters, follow these common-sense guidelines to keep your chickens safe.
Many of our domestic chicken breeds were cultivated for colder temperatures. They have down feathers insulating their bodies, they naturally move regularly to keep warm and they instinctively know to eat more when Old Man Winter comes knocking. Continue Reading

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