View Over 1,400 Different Types of Chicken Coops, and More

Which coop is right for your needs? That’s a question only you can answer. The only perfect coop is the one that’s suitable for your specific needs. You’ll need to take into consideration the climate where you live, how much space you have for a coop, and how large it needs to be to comfortably house your birds.

I’ve said it many times, but I’ll say it again, the more coop space the better. Always build bigger than what you think is adequate, especially if your chickens will be confined. Remember, happy chickens fill the egg basket!

Keep in mind that a coop should be convenient for you to clean. One you can stand up in is a huge plus. At the very least, a coop should be easy to access drinkers, feeders, and of course, fresh eggs. Bedding material should be just as easy to remove as it is to refresh. That means the door of your coop should be large enough for a standard size rake to fit through.

Follow the links below to view a collection of over 800 different types of chicken coops. I’ve also a collection of over 500 drinkers, feeders, roost types, brooders, and nest box ideas. You can also view over a 100 building plan options. Let’s Get Started!

Chicken Coop Types
Traditional Coops
Huge Coops
Different Styles & Types
Unique Coops
Coop Building Plans
Set- Up Ideas

The Essentials in Chicken Keeping
Nest Box Ideas
Brooder Boxes
Roost Ideas
Drinker Types & Automatic Systems
Feeder Types

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Custom Nest Boxes!

Coop improvements are never ending aren’t they? One little change always seems to lead to another. Maybe this time I had a little something to do with that. I ordered a ridiculous amount of chicks this fall and although I have enough space to accommodate the numbers, the nest box situation came up short.

I must have complained enough to my husband about this self inflicted problem, and just look at what he built for me!  What a guy!

nest boxxes 101615

Anything new of substantial of size in the hen house means some serious rearranging of everything inside. Needless to say, I’ve spent the last few days in a chicken coop. But it was so worth it!

Do I dare mention to hubby that my grow pens are full and I’m expecting a bunch of Mille Fluers in a few weeks?

Broody Hens in the Coop

A Solution… For When the Broodies Take Over the Nests

Broody Silkies 5-3-14
Broody hens claiming the community nest area.

Sometimes broody hens can take over the nest area and not let any other members of the flock enter the hen house or their nests. That means the other hen’s routine is upset and this can interrupt or even stop egg production.

It’s better to move the broodies to a confined area. But if you don’t have a separate area suitable for them, sometimes it’s just better to go with the flow and put extra nest boxes in the coop for the others. This is a much better idea than to let them find a place on their own, because what you’ll be doing in that case is going on an everyday egg hunt!

Nest Box
Extra Nest Box

As you can see, members of the existing flock will rather quickly claim the new extra nest boxes and egg production will eventually resume. One way or the other, problem solved! To help them along, a ceramic egg or golf ball in the box often helps lure them in.

Simple? Probably not, it’s almost inevitable that two hens will claim the same box!  So put out a few!

 

 

 

 

Creative Poultry Keeping

Whatever Works!

When raising chickens there are only three things that matter… food, water, and shelter.

You can spend a lot of money for an elaborate set-up, but quite honestly, half the fun is being creative with the resources you have on hand.

There’s no need for fancy, chickens are very docile and non-destructive. Whatever you can provide that will protect them from predators is sufficient. Their nesting area needn’t be large, they actually prefer tight quarters. I made the mistake of giving every bird her own nest box when I first started raising poultry. However, one box for every two to three birds is definitely their preference. This nest box pictured below will easily accommodate four birds.

Store bought nest boxes are certainly pretty, but they are also expensive. Check the garage, or a flea market for something else that might be suitable. Apple crates work nicely for example. Or visit a Home Depot, they sell scrap wood in the lumber dept. for as little as fifty cents a board, what a bargain! Have your measurements ready because the first two cuts are free!

Here in Arizona it’s time to start a flock, the weather is perfect for chicks by mid October. In other parts of the country it’s time to research, plan, and prepare for the spring flock. Have fun in your adventure!