Help for Determining the Sex of Silkie Bantams

It’s difficult, but not totally impossible to determine the sex of a Silkie. There are signs that can help you long before the first egg or crow of a rooster. Behavior and size can be a good indication of sex.

Roosters are often more bold, have that sturdy or stronger look, and sometimes they are larger. These are noticeable traits, even when chicks are still in the brooder.  Look for brighter, or sharper distinction of color in birds of the same when they reach 8 or 9 weeks. Rooster seem to stand out more, dazzling you with a little wow factor.

These Silkies are all just under 3 months old, 2 white, 2 buff. The white Silkie pictured below is  probably a Rooster. He is much larger, and has been at the top of the pecking order since the second week of life. The size between pic 1 and 2 is obvious, recognizing behavior traits is something you’ll notice by watching your own birds.

Pic 1: (Jo)  Probably a Rooster

Jo, Silkie 12-17-14

Pic 2: (Pat) Probably a Pullet

Pat, Silkie 12-17-14

Pic 3: Front, (Fanny) Probably a Rooster. Rear, (Randi) Probably a Pullet

Fanny 2 Silkie 12-17-14

All we really can do is learn behavior traits of roosters and recognize indications such as size. But I must admit, I’ve been absolutely positive on having a Silkie rooster… and been surprised 6 months later when it laid an egg.  Gotta love those Silkie Bantams!

FYI: Most, if not all hatcheries sell only straight-run (unsexed) Silkie Bantams except My Pet Chicken. They offer sexed female Silkie chicks at a higher price. They also will ship only a few. They did a good job sexing five female Silkies for me, 4 out of 5 were indeed females.

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A Guide To Understanding The Chicken Pecking Order

If your new to keeping chickens you may have already witnessed social drama in the chicken yard. Sometimes it can get ugly when a flock is establishing a pecking order, and it’s especially disturbing to watch when introducing new birds. I hope this article helps you better understand the social behavior among chickens. Once you learn how it all works, you’ll find your own clever ways minimize trouble.
Tips: Provide food and water in more than one place so the lower birds in the pecking order aren’t bullied. Don’t overcrowd the coop or yard, offer enough space, allowing weaker birds to escape to safety from the dominate ones.

What Is The Pecking Order And Why Is It Important?

BYC

The chicken is a social bird that enjoys the company of its flock. Many social animals work out a hierarchy, and the chicken is no exception. The hierarchy created is a means of attaining and keeping order. When referring to this ordered social structure in chickens, and sometimes other bird species, it is called the Pecking Order.  Read Article

Keep Your Rooster Quiet, Here’s How

This may be the answer to a common problem for chicken keepers who aren’t allowed by city ordinances to have a rooster.

Wearing this collar, a rooster may be no louder than a hen.  Learn more…

Update: My thoughts after trying the No Crow Collar… 
Didn’t work unless I literally made it so tight that I felt I was being cruel to my rooster. 

 

 

Big News! No-Crow Rooster Collar

Update: Tried the No-Crow Rooster Collar… I’m not impressed. My Rooster was VERY uncomfortable & could still crow.

Does this mean the semi-urban backyard chicken keeper can finally have a rooster? I don’t know! I’ll be watching for the reviews on this product, hopefully it will be positive.

The news of this No Crow Rooster Collar came in my email today from My Pet Chicken. You can learn more by visiting their website, but here’s a sneak peek of what they have to say…

NO CROW

New! Special introductory price! Can’t have crowing? You’re in luck. An enterprising, doting backyarder who wanted both roosters and happy neighbors decided to take matters into her own hands. She designed, tested, tweaked, tweaked some more, and finally patented the world’s only collar designed to dramatically reduce both the volume and the frequency of crowing.
Learn More