Adding Chicks of Different Ages to the Brooder

Sometimes size matters in the brooder, but there are ways to avoid and resolve trouble. I added four new chicks to the brooder a week ago. Two blue and two silver laced six day old standard Cochins… and put them in the brooder with my three week old Silkie Bantams.

Age doesn’t matter much to baby chicks, size however, can be reason enough to start a bully fest. The six day old Cochins were the same size as the Silkies, but now, a week later, the Cochins are substantially bigger. The size issue seems to go unnoticed when chicks are  raised together, so they’ll continue to share the same brooder in harmony.

If new chicks refuse to get along, it’s easy enough to put a divider between the chicks, as long as they can see each other it will be pretty uneventful to reintroduce them in a week or so.

After the Brooder Stage

At two months these little fuzzy butts will be moved from the brooder to a transitional coop where they’ll be in full view of the existing flock. Around four or five months the coop door will open and they’ll have a choice to venture out and join the existing flock,  but they probably won’t for days, sometimes even a week!

Then What?
It’s reality time, and their peaceful world comes to a screeching halt when they’re finally brave enough to step out and explore the real world. A world that is run by powerful chicken rulers who have earned their significant positions in the pecking order.
Learn More about the Pecking Order and Adding Chickens to an Existing Flock

Chicks Ready to Meet the Flock? Here’s How.

I have to put my two cents in here and add that size is an important factor when introducing new birds. In my opinion, young birds should be somewhat the same size if you want to help avoid bullying from the existing mature flock. It’s not at all uncommon for an existing flock to pick on the smaller birds, especially around feed. Put water and feed in two places to help assure your youngsters or newcomers have access.

Defining Donkey Terms

Beamer

Ass, Burro, Donkey, and there’s more! Which is which and why? Learn the terminology and meanings here.

In this article: donkey terms, markings, size, and a source of further information.

 Ass: 

The correct term for the animal commonly known as the donkey, burro, or jackstock.  The term comes from the original Latin term for the animal which was Asinus.  The scientific term for these animals is Equus asinus.  The term fell into disrepute through confusion with the indelicate term “Arse” meaning the human backside.  You are never at fault when you refer to one of these animals as an ass, and the term is not improper unless you misuse it so yourself.  The difference between asses and horses is a species difference.  You might compare it to the differences between zebras and horses, different species but closely related and able to interbreed to a degree.

Jack:

The term used for the male of the ass species.  Thus, the often used term Jackass – which is correct if redundant. Jacks are called stallions in the UK, but stallion is reserved for horses and zebra males in the US.

Jennet:

Pronounced JEN-et, the correct term for the female of the species.   The more commonly used term is Jenny, which is considered correct in non-technical use.  The term mare is used for horse and zebra females in the US. (But a jennet is a mare in the UK)

Burro:

A word taken directly from Spain.  It means the common, everyday working donkey found in Spain and Mexico.  It came into usage in the Western United States.  As a general rule, the term burro is heard West of the Mississippi and the term Donkey, east of the Mississippi. Burro is not appropriate for use in referring to Miniature Donkeys or Jackstock.

Wild Burro:

These are the feral (descended from domestic stock that has gone wild over generations) asses which run wild in the Western part of the United States. The American Donkey and Mule Society and Bureau of Land Management (who are in charge of the Wild Burro population)  prefer to keep the term Burro for these animals.

Jack Stock:

(Jackstock) The term for plural of the American Mammoth Jack and Jennet.  These animals are properly termed Asses and not donkeys, and never called burros.  They are one of the largest of the types of the ass species.

Gelding Donkey:

The proper term for a gelded (castrated, or “altered” male ass.  An informal term is John (a modified form of Jack).

Spanish Jack or Spanish Donkey:

ADMS does not accept this terminology unless the animal has written documented proof of importation of itself or its immediate ancestors from Spain.  This holds for animals which people call by the breed names of foreign breeds such as Catalonian, Maltese, or Andalusian.  These breeds as pure strains are rare even in Spain, and are non-existent  in the US. The term Spanish Donkey is found in common usage meaning a large standard donkey  The ancestry of most of the donkeys in the United States is predominantly a blend of all of the Spanish breeds.  In any case, the term is inexact and is not good usage.

Mule Jack:

Not a mule, but a jackass used to breed mares to obtain mules.

Jennet Jack:

Jackass used to breed to jennets (the female of the species) in order to produce more donkeys.  A good breeder uses only the finest of jacks for this purpose.

Longears:

Slang, commonly used, although not recognized as a proper term.

British Terms:

The terms jack and jennet have been abandoned and turned to stallion and mare instead.  Also, a hinny is commonly called a jennet in England.

Markings and Size

The Cross: Refers to a line of darker hairs starting at the top of the head and running to the end of the tail. (Dorsal stripe)  This is crossed at the withers with another darker line of hair (the shoulder stripe) forming a cross.  The shoulder stripe may be long, very short, thin, wide, fading or dashed, but nearly all donkeys have some form of this marking.  The exceptions are the Mammoth asses which have been bred away from this marking, and true black animals where the cross is not visible. Even spotted animals or white-appearing donkeys may have partial or faint crosses.  This trait is very dominant.  The presence of this marking on donkeys has led to many lovely legends in the Christian religion.  The term Jerusalem donkey is often incorrectly applied to donkeys with the normal cross marking. It is a nickname, and not a true breed or type.

Markings:  In addition to the cross, many donkeys have dark markings on the ears, as “garters” (zebra marks) around the legs, or as “zippers” down the inside of the forelegs.  Small black spots on the sides of the throat, called collar buttons, may also be seen, as well as a dark line (ventral stripe) down the belly.

White Points: When registering donkeys, white points are so universally normal that only the absence of them is to be noted.  It is normal for a donkey to have short, fine, light colored hair on the muzzle (although the lips themselves will have darker hair), ringing the eyes, on the belly and inside of the legs.   A donkey that does not have these points is seen as unusual but are not too uncommon.  The gene for No Light Points  (*NLP) appears to be recessive.  A few donkeys will have only a small patch of lighter (tan, not the usual soft white) hair only a the side of the muzzle, with dark around the eyes and a tan belly.  This is noted in registration papers as an Intermediate Black

Muzzle:  Just having dark lips, with the fine muzzle hair being light, is not a black muzzle.

Common Sizes of Mules or Donkeys

Miniature = 36″ or less at the withers
Small Standard = 36.01″ up to 40″
Standard = 40.01″ up to 48″
Large Standard = jennets are 48.01″ up to 54″, jacks are 48.01″ up to 56″
Mammoth = jennets are 54.01″ and over, jacks are 56.01″ and over

Interesting Facts

“Standard Donkey” and the origin and breeding is given as Wild Burro.
Donkey:  Taken from England, the derivation is uncertain, but most authorities think that the name comes from dun (the usual color) and the suffix “ky” meaning small.  Thus “a little dun animal”.  In earlier England the word Ass was taken from the Roman word for the animal.  “Donkey” is a relatively recent variation of the species name.

Didn’t find what you were looking for? You’ll find a wealth of information about donks and mules HERE.

Source: lovelongears.com

Naked Neck Turken

Turken

The Turken is a light brown egg layer and considered a dual purpose utility chicken. It is especially suitable  for meat production as the breed has approximately half the feathers of other chickens, making them easier to pluck.

These birds are cold hardy and heat tolerant, excellent foragers, and immune to most diseases.

Their appearance is rather odd and not particularly appealing to some. Perhaps this explains why they’re not usually known to be an exhibition bird.

• Size: 6.5 to 8 pounds
• Type: Large Fowl & Bantam
• Varieties: Black, Buff, Red, White
• Egg Laying: 2-3 per week
• Egg Size: Medium
• Egg Color: Light Brown
• Comb Type: Single
• Personality: Docile & Friendly
• Broody/Setters: Yes

What Are Egg Grades?

There are three consumer grades for eggs: U.S. Grade AA, A, and B. The grade is determined by the interior quality of the egg and the appearance and condition of the egg shell. Eggs of any quality grade may differ in weight (size).

U.S. Grade AA eggs have whites that are thick and firm; yolks that are high, round, and practically free from defects; and clean, unbroken shells. Grade AA and Grade A eggs are best for frying and poaching where appearance is important.

U.S. Grade A eggs have characteristics of Grade AA eggs except that the whites are “reasonably” firm. This is the quality most often sold in stores.

U.S. Grade B eggs have whites that may be thinner and yolks that may be wider and flatter than eggs of higher grades. The shells must be unbroken, but may show slight stains. This quality is seldom found in retail stores because they are usually used to make liquid, frozen, and dried egg products.

Sizing of Eggs
Size tells you the minimum required net weight per dozen eggs. It does not refer to the dimensions of an egg or how big it looks. While some eggs in the carton may look slightly larger or smaller than the rest, it is the total weight of the dozen eggs that puts them in one of the following classes:

Jumbo         30 ounces
Extra Large  27 ounces
Large           24 ounces
Medium       21 ounces
Small          18 ounces
Peewee       15 ounces

Source: United States Dept. of Agriculture, USDA
Food Safety and Inspection Service